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The Making of Blue Druid Mead

Artisanal, small batch meads produced with local, natural ingredients.

All Blue Druid meads begin with raw, unfiltered, 100% Nova Scotia honey, with no additional or refined sugars. As honey varieties can change as much as the seasons and the fields the bees are in, we create a recipe for every batch to highlight the subtle complexity of the honey used, the seasons, and a nod to Nova Scotia's history. Take a look at what you might find in your next bottle of Blue Druid Mead.

 

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100% Nova Scotia Honey

All Blue Druid Mead is made with 100% unfiltered Nova Scotia honey, with current suppliers from the Annapolis Valley to the Cape Breton Highlands. We are fiercely proud to use locally sourced ingredients, and the honey produced in Nova Scotia gives us the opportunity to create world class mead.

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Hops

Many of our meads are hopped, providing perfect balance of bitter and sweet.  Each hops blend is unique, but some of our favorite varieties include Fundy (produced in Nova Scotia), East Kent Goldings, Citra, Cascade and Mosaic.

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Malted Barley

The addition of grain to a mead produces what is known as a braggot. Braggot was a drink of choice, primarily in Europe, largely throughout the post-Renaissance period, and was fairly prominent in areas such as Wales up until the 1800s. In fact, the many names used to denote braggot, including bragget, bragaut, bracket, bragot and bragawd, are derived from Irish and Welsh roots, brach and brag respectively, for the words “to sprout” in reference to the grain portion of the honey beverage.

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Seasonal Fruit

Fruit can be added to mead in either the primary fermentation, secondary fermentation, or both.  Fruit additions provide flavour, colour and acidity to meads and are collectively known as melomels.  Specifically, meads made with apples are called cysers, while meads made with grapes are called pyments.

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Maple Syrup

True to our Canadian heritage, maple syrup sometimes finds its way into our meads, either in primary fermentation, or in the finish.  A mead with the addition of maple syrup is called an acerglyn.

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Tea, Herbs and Spices

Mead with the addition of tea, herbs or spices are called metheglins.  The origin of the term comes from the Welsh word meddyglyn, meading meddyg healer (from Latin medicus medical) + llyn liquor, and come by their name because of mead's ancient, witchcraft, and healing traditions in folk medicine.  These additions provide tannins, taste, colour and interest to complement and balance the honey in meads.

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Oak

The oaks used (American, French, Hungarian) are carefully chosen based on the flavor qualities they posses. There are many different flavour compounds in oak that influence the flavor, the most influential being vanillin. This compound can add flavours to the mead ranging from coconut, to vanilla, to even Caramel depending on the variety of oak selected and how it is toasted.

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Time and Patience

At Blue Druid, we know that time is often the best ingredient to produce an exceptional mead.  The aging process varies widely depending on the yeast and ingredients, and every batch is carefully curated and bottled only when the mead's age allows.

Proudly Canadian            maple_leaf.jpg            Fiercely Nova Scotian